RSS

Tag Archives: motivation

Life is like the flowing River

Life is like the flowing River

Ganges. The beautiful flowing river. The river is personified as the Goddess Ganga. I heard someone refer to it as ‘Ganga Ma” (Mother). I had the privilege of standing on the banks of the river Ganga earlier this week in Rishikesh, dipping my feet in her holiness, feeling the force of her flow and suddenly so much happened within me.

Catharsis. That’s what I felt.

I struggle within myself. There are emotions that have been suppressed over childhood, that at times seek solace. They come out and as an adult it becomes harder to deal with it, as we are supposed to be in charge of our emotions. So, the suppression continues. Emotional padding is done. Band-aids put in place, until it re-surfaces. It’s a cycle. Some emotional set back can trigger a reaction and then the cycle continues. It’s a tough place at times. So, I struggle, as I know many do.

So, there in that moment, as I saw the river flow it occurred to me how selfless the river was. It just flowed. It took with it all that flowed with it – all that was dropped into it.

Ganga Ma, the flowing river taught me lessons:

  • She is powerful. She knows her strength. Be like her.
  • She goes with the flow. Be like her. Just flow. Just be.
  • She takes everything in her stride and drops some things along the way. So can I.
  • Some stay part of the way, some will stay the course. Remember that all are not meant to be on the journey together forever.
  • She goes through ups and downs, yet remained focussed on her journey. Never faltering. So, there is a lesson in it.
  • Her destination was controlled by so many – dams, canals, bridges, but the journey was her real gift. That’s so true for all of us. Enjoy the journey.
  • She showed love and she showed her anger  – both felt by those who understood her. It was okay to show emotions but only to those who are part of the journey and care.
  • Most of all she showed me how to cleanse – the mind, the body and the soul, and to keep growing. Every moment. Every day.
  • She taught me to give selflessly. Without expectations. Unconditionally.

I stood there, humbled, hands folded, eyes closed, in prayer. Just listening to her flow. Feeling her energy within me. Wanting to capture that moment inside me so I could carry it beyond that evening.

I felt it was time to cleanse myself. Of my old baggages. Leaving behind those that needed to get off that flowing river. Carrying along new souls as part of the journey. Just being. Just loving. Just living.

Catharsis. Release. Peace. Seeking comfort within. Food  and substance was no longer my comfort. I had found my peace. My release. 

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 46-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

Follow me on FB.

Pic courtesy: Nicola Fenton.

 

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 13, 2016 in Diabetes, Energy, Motivation

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

So, you think you want to lose weight?

So, you think you want to lose weight?

It must be New Year my head said, when at the beginning of this week I had an almost “auto-like” feeling transmitted to me – time to lose it. I have lost many things this year, but the weight. That stayed :-). 

May be I tried too hard, but perhaps I tried all the wrong things. May be that was the problem – I “tried” to lose weight.

Losing weight is causing me to lose my mind, nearly. I seem to be in this state of absolute weightlessness when it comes to losing weight. Things I tell myself when I am ‘not’ in that frame of mind:

  • I will start tomorrow. So today, let me binge. After all tomorrow I have to give it all up.
  • Just one – That one chocolate, one biscuit, one glass of wine, that one …  is not going to cause me to gain weight. After the first one, it stops to matter any way.
  • I have worked so hard this week, I have earned this extra dessert, or two, or three .
  • I am so sad today, my close FB friend lost her close FB’s friends contact details. I need to drown my sorrows on her behalf. Let’s drink?
  • Today was the best day of my life – I nearly won an award (I was nearly shortlisted, so let’s celebrate today). Chocolates, ice creams, wine, and even a late night. Let me sleep only 2 hours, so I can then sleep through the entire day tomorrow and skip breakfast and lunch

Then one morning I decide this is it and go for it. I have endless days and evenings  at the gym –  I give up alcohol, my favourite ice creams, skip bread, white rice, butter; all that which I am told is bad food, high calorie stuff that causes me to get that extra tyre. I do it religiously.

Then suddenly one day I wake up with an excuse. No matter how hard I try, I SLIP. This slip is more slithery than the banana slip, because you can stay down for days without realising it.

It’s a scary place to be, because this kind of slip brings in many other emotional issues as well. Guilt, shame, failure, embarrassment, self loathing, low self esteem, and fear. Huge fear of failing.

So, you think you are are ready to lose weight? Think again. And think very carefully. Because it is not an easy path. It is not that hard either. But it will take every bit of you to stick to your promise to yourself. You will be faced with the biggest demons ‘your excuses”.

Weight loss requires one thing, and only one key thing. Forget all the rest. Forget what you read earlier, what someone told you, what even I said earlier.

The only thing you need if you really want to lose it, is COMMITMENT. Total commitment to yourself. And if you can do that, you  are ready to lose it. Let’s go for it? Together? Come join me … And this time, it will be the weight that we will lose. 

My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert,  Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

Watch my interviews  for some simple tips. 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 6, 2016 in Diabetes, Diet, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

AM I WILLING TO HAVE A RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF?

AM I WILLING TO HAVE A RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF?

Am I willing to have a relationship with myself?

That’s a question I ask myself often. It may sound silly and I can see you thinking, ‘God help me, for being with me‘ LOL, but jokes apart, seriously, have you ever considered committing to yourself in that way? In a way you commit to your relationships? In a way that you are with your own partners.

I am not commitment-phobic, but I definitely need to  learn to fully commit. I fear:

1. Taking the first step

 2: How to keep the fire burning

Both are are equally tough barriers to break. For the longest time, I found myself running away from taking that first step. I knew that taking the first step meant committing. Commitment means discipline, focus, determination, giving up things you love for a while at least, being more responsible about the choices one makes, and so on. That is truly a tough one. It’s like getting into a relationship with yourself.  And telling yourself, you are committed to you. Then following through with that commitment. It is not easy. I have let myself down so many times, that I feared that commitment.

I eventually took the first step, and stuck with it for a long time. I dropped a few sizes, my confidence came back  and more so, I regained my health. Then I lost the most dear person in my life, my mother. I went back into a hole. It’s like I divorced myself. I decided I was going to self-sabotage to deal through the pain. Slowly, the weight and the dysfunctions returned. The same old patterns re-surfaced. Poor choices began to make their way back in. My divorced self decided to let go of the relationship with me.

Then I re-committed. And every now and again I falter. I give in to temptations. I hurt – I eat. I feel pain – I drink. I feel tired – I eat. I feel upsetI skip exercise and get into my duvet. And that pattern continues.

Yet, taking that first step has its own excitement. It’s new, it’s fun. It’s euphoric. You are getting to know your own body, your patterns, your own inner self better. You wake up each morning and decide that it will be your day.  Until…one day, the desire, the motivation diminishes. The excitement of the new-ness goes. The excuses start creeping back in. Every thing starts being an effort.

That’s the barrier that I need to break is to stay motivated long after the excitement of committing to something new has diminished.  Just like how it can get in a relationship. How does one stay motivated?

By taking the Vows and staying committed.

So, I am making FIVE vows to me:

Vow 1: I shall change my perspective of looking at change.

I am committing to my own self growth, for my good, and having a relationship with myself so I can live a longer, healthier life. That in itself should be enough motivation.

Vow 2: I shall re-tune my thinking

No one is asking me to give up on food and spirits, or whatever keeps me excited. It’s not a punishment, it’s a lifestyle. Make small changes for food choices and add exercise. Be consistent and do it every day.

Vow 3:I shall only be amongst like-minded people

This is the biggest asset that one can build. When people are on a journey together, they won’t ever tell you ‘one last drink’, or ‘have this for me’, or ‘come on, it’s only for a day’. They will support you, understand your ups and downs, and still be with you. That’s why I choose to be around you positive people.

Vow 4: I shall stay away from negativity

I will be amongst those who love me and  are willing to share in my journey. Negativity sucks energy. There are many out there happily waiting to  inject their negativity into me. I am staying away from it. I don’t deserve it and I don’t need it in my life.

Vow 5: I shall learn to love myself unconditionally 

This to me is the most critical vow. When we love ourselves (obviously in a functional way),we know the right choices to make. Food, body, mind, spirit, all aspects. The motivation will come on its own.I vow to love myself unconditionally. I may not be easy to live with, and will have my good days and bad, but hey, if I don’t love myself, who else will?

The barriers will break only by remembering that we can control our mind. That’s where it is all stored. The motivation. Come, let’s continue on this journey, together.

Follow me on : Facebook

My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert , Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , ,

12 weeks – ‘Use it to Lose it’ Challenge

12 weeks – ‘Use it to Lose it’ Challenge

I am re-sharing this post from last year, with minor edits for us to take on this challenge again. Yay girls, let’s do this.

Thank you for joining me in my journey. Again, just to remind you all, I am not a doctor nor a nutritionist.  This is not a diet nor a weight loss programme. I will simply share what worked for me and what I intend to do, to reclaim health, re-tune my habits/lifestyle, and in turn lose the excess fat and get fit again. This is intended to support those who need that first step to jump start the change, and to also support each other during the next 12 weeks. 

Join our group, click here>>>> Use it to Lose it with Raga (a closed door group only for women.

Do remember,  we all are at different stages in our lives – so although we are embarking on this part of our journey together, there are many factors that will determine the results.  So, no comparing. No cheating. No excuses. We will do it our way. I hope we all stay the course and make this work – whatever our individual goal. 

One thing works universally for all – commitment. That is the key. It wont’ be easy, but it won’t be hard either. We will focus on re-tuning our thinking, making better food choices, adding activity to our daily lives and supporting each other to stay motivated. 

Key is to work together and keep each other motivated, positively. 

STOP THE EXCUSES PLEASE (This applies to me too) :

I AM TOO OLD: I was 42 when I first lost nearly 30 kilos and beat diabetes, liver diseases, kidney ailments and host of other imbalances my poor lifestyle had created. I did it through pure commitment. I found my age to be a major strength. My commitment levels are much stronger now. 

I RUN AROUND ALL DAY AND YET I GAIN WEIGHT: Well, true, but that is not exercise love. Don’t assume or be in denial about activity. Set time aside each day for exercise in any form you are able to. For those with sedentary lifestyles, this is an absolute must.  For those with active lifestyles, change the routine, push harder. 

I HARDLY EAT ANYTHING: You do love, you do.  There are some of us who have a regular high calorie, high fat diet. Some of us eat small meals, but snack a lot in-between meals, whereas some prefer smaller meals but will eat large portions of dessert. That’s how we get fat.It doesn’t just happen.  Can we stop being in denial and don’t let yourself fall into a trap of ‘denial’. Remember, every morsel counts – stop yourself from eating that last piece of pizza, toast, snack from your kids, partners plate. 

IT’S NOW ABOUT THE WEIGHT, IT IS ABOUT THE FAT: Let’s stop dwelling on this whole weight loss nonsense. Let’s focus on shedding that fat, losing those extra inches. We don’t all need to have amazing gym bodies. We need to have less fat in our bodies so we can be healthy and stay alive fully. Not on meds, not on insulin. But stay high on life. 

WHAT WORKED FOR ME:

1.Re-tune the way I thought about food.  We are not scrap yards – so why eat junk food? Seriously, as much as we love our fast food, there are better options available. I will avoid white bread, rice, noodles, pasta (unless whole wheat), sugar, dessert, carbs and sweets are out for me. 

2.Eat 6 small meals per day: I divide my day into 6 blocks: Morning, Mid morning, Afternoon, Mid afternoon, Evening and Night and plan my meals accordingly. I eat frequently but make healthy choices. For snacks its mostly nuts, fruit, raisins, dry fruit. I do not indulge in cereal bars or anything that is processed – it has high sugar content that has its own impact. 

2. Make small changes: 

  • Did you know plates can have a huge role in our food portions? for instance, using a smaller plate helps with portion size (even if you fill it up, it is better than filling up a large plate with food), research shows that using coloured plates verses white plates can help with portion sizes. Avoid second helpings.
  • Diet coke? Aerated drinks/Energy drinks: These are all excess sugar we don’t need. Junk it. Drink plenty of water (nimbu pani). During my own journey I used to drink 10-12 glasses a day. Helps with detox, makes you less hungry and is extremely useful for digestion.
  • Plan weekly menu :I will plan my menu a week in advance, so I have no excuse to eat junk.
  • Maintain a Food/Drink/Activity Diary: I joined MFT (www.myfitnesspal.com) a free online diary to log in my food/drinks/activity and manage my calorie intake. You can find me there. My online name is ‘Raaless’. Happy to help you online when you log in as well.
  • Add Walk walk walk to your day:  I bought myself a pedometer (fitbit) and ensured that I measured number of steps. I started with 5000 steps a day, and slowly built it to 12k-15k a day. It is a great game you can play with yourself. It will come as a surprise to many how little we walk each day, and how much fun it can be to track steps.
  • Love yourself: Learning to love myself was most important. We forget the most important person in our lives – and that is ourselves. Less stressing about things, finding time to do little things for myself – sleeping better (8 hours atleast ) and not worrying about every thing in life. All that is so critical as well.

My story so far: 

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness. 

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

 

Tags: , , ,

EITHER YOU DO, OR YOU DON’T. THERE IS NO IN-BETWEEN

EITHER YOU DO, OR YOU DON’T. THERE IS NO IN-BETWEEN

This is so true. When you commit to something, you either do it, or you don’t. There is simply no in-between. When you even contemplate an ‘in-between’ and indulge yourself with excuses, you don’t achieve what you set out to, in the first place. I refrain from using the word ‘fail’, as sometimes, we have to try a few times before we succeed, and some just need that extra push.As you grow, there are IMG_2678many things you learn about yourself.

One of the things I admitted to myself was that I simply put off stuff that I felt was too hard for me. I did the easy things first, and half heartedly attempted new challenges only to let go mid way.  If I did not succeed, I allowed myself multitude of excuses. My poor health in 2012 and the fear of not being in this world for long enough, made me sit up and take stock.

Things I changed:

I stopped being in denial: I admitted to myself that I was unwell due to my own doing. I had made very poor choices in my life – particularly emotional choices, which led to making poor choices in my lifestyle, which had led to my huge weight gain.

I committed to myself that I would finish whatever I started, no matter what: So, I first committed to losing all the excess weight I was carrying. I did. I lost 4 stone in 8 months. Then, I decided to get my health back. I exercised, ate better and made better life choices – I reclaimed my health and my emotional life. Then, in November 2014, I set myself a challenge to run my first half marathon, a day after my 45th birthday. I did that as well.

Was it easy? No. Was it hard? Yes. Would I do it again? Yes. Why? Simply, because it taught me things that I would never have learnt otherwise. And, because, I found that insane hidden part of me, finally 🙂

Lessons learnt:

  • I felt more alive than ever: New Challenges give you renewed life. You are never too young or too old for anything, I did my half marathon on my 45th birthday. I was told that I was insane, (just as I was told when at 42 I wanted to shed that excess fat). I looked forward to training and the big day, every day. I felt alive. Every ache and pain in my body was earned. I loved it.
  • Giving up (despite my injury) was not even an option : Such Challenges test you. I had no desire to prove anything to anyone but myself. I set that challenge for myself, and I wanted to prove to myself that I could do this. I had never run before, so I had no idea what it felt to run for kind of distance. It felt just right for me. Scary enough to push me, yet not kill me. I was tested all the way – training routine was not easy as my overseas travel came in the way of my training. But if previously I would make excuses not to exercise, I found myself making excuses to exercise and find the nearest gym. I struggled with jet-lag, lack of sleep, severe back ache, and many many inside demons asking me to give up. Then on the day of the run, at the 10km mark, I felt my left foot go under. I had managed to sprain my foot, and I had 13 kms to go. Giving up was not even considered. I had to work on Plan B. Instead of running, I decided to do brisk walk and jog whenever possible. It was the toughest 1.5 hrs I have done, almost akin to going through labour pains. It tested me. Tested my will. Tested my endurance. Tested my pain threshold. And, the sense of achievement I felt when I reached the finish line was something I cannot even put into words. You have to experience it, to understand.
  • The strength of our mind is limitless:  I had heard this before, and I tested it. Seriously, it’s all in our mind. There is nothing we cannot do, if we set our minds to it. 3 years ago, I couldn’t even imagine walking 100 metres without complaining or thinking I needed medical help. The strength of our mind is absolutely limitless. We need to test is more often.
  • It made me hungry for more: Now that I have experienced the euphoria of such a challenge, I want more. I am looking for my next adventure. It doesn’t have to be harder, but needs to be harder, so I can push myself further. 

Every new challenge for me is dedicated to my peers, regardless of whether we have met or not. That age is simply a number. Do not create any limiting boundaries for yourself. Keep pushing yourself to live every day, to the fullest.

I want to die healthy and happy. But before that, I want to live healthy and happy. 

Thank you Diabetes UK for the opportunity to support my community in overcoming this silent killer.

For those who want to support me in my quest do click on www.justgiving.com/wildestdreams and make a donation to help those with diabetes .

My story

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with the disorder in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness. This is her story, in her own words.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 4, 2015 in Diabetes

 

Tags: , , , ,

LIVING MY WILDEST DREAM, HALF MARATHON (21 KMS) IN 18 WEEKS

LIVING MY WILDEST DREAM, HALF MARATHON (21 KMS) IN 18 WEEKS

My story so far:

So those of you who have followed my journey would know how difficult it was for me that time in 2012, when I was very ill. Walking 5 minutes was a huge effort, let alone the thought of running. It was only going to get worse, and possibly result in the ultimate – death.  It was pure strength of will, focus, absolute determination, hard work and the support of my family and close circle of friends that helped me reclaim my health and my life. I have come a long way since then. I can now run 5 kms, I won’t say effortlessly, but quite easily.  On my recent trip to Brixen, Italy I had a few minutes to make up my mind about para-gliding in the Dolomites. I have never done any thing like this before. I decided to just go for it. And what an amazing 20 minutes that was, flying high in the sky over 3500 meters above ground, looking down at the valley. It was beyond anything I had experienced  or imagined before. I suddenly learnt the power of mental endurance. Then a couple of weeks later, came the opportunity to do a 15 kms Bridges Challenge for Diabetes UK  which further reaffirmed my belief in myself, and what I could achieve, if I set my mind to it. This gave me the will to set out a new challenge. With continued encouragement from all of you out there, I know I can do this. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 7, 2014 in Diet, Energy, Exercise, Motivation

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Is Forty an age to die? Diabetes can kill.

Is Forty an age to die? Diabetes can kill.

Is 40  an age to die? I wasn’t ready then, I am not ready now. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 9, 2014 in Diabetes, Exercise, Motivation

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Time for Exercise ? Try This

No time for exercise? Try this…!!

Please follow my Facebookpage

My blog is not about losing weight. It is about re-gaining health. I am a middle-aged woman, with a full-on life. I lost control for a while, gained huge amount of weight in a very short span, and got very ill.  I was told I couldn’t live much longer if I did not do something about it. The starting point for me was to lose the excess weight. It was not easy. It was not hard either. It was just about making a decision and taking action. I decided to take one day at a time. Every day, I focussed on that one day. And slowly, things changed. I lost the weight. I re-gained my health. My diabetes went into remission. I no longer suffer from hypertension. My liver is fine. The stone in my gall bladder is getting smaller. Is it a “miracle” as we would like to believe? No. It is simply, about making a decision and taking action, and sticking with it, every day.

One common phrase I have heard over and over again, “You are so lucky, you can exercise, I have no time to exercise”!

Seriously, one thing we all have in common is the 24 hours we get. What we do with those 24 hours each day, is what makes us different.

Make the decision and take action:

I have been there — making hundreds of excuses for not being able to exercise> some of my common excuses were:

  • No time – long days, and longer nights of work !
  • Travel – as you all know, I travel atleast 10-15 days a month
  • Children – Two teenagers is a full-time job plus more…
  • Social life – late nights can be tiring … with all that eating, and drinking!
  • Unpredictable life – I have to travel at short notice at times
  • Over 40 – My life is now about my children, so why bother!
  • Why put the effort – Exercise does take effort.
  • What will people think – Oh, I thought the whole world was watching 🙂
All of the above is totally true, and has not changed, honestly. But, I decided to work with it.  So, I make use of what I have, with the time I have.
Just simple things to do at home. Remember, every little thing does count, as my trainer once told me, “everything is CBO” (Calorie Burning Opportunity).  Ten calories here, and ten calories there…it all adds up. And it’s fun!!!
  • Buckets: Oh, that’s the best. I use half filled buckets (soaked with whites) to lift. helps with building my core, and also my arms.
  • kichen bench for push ups – while cooking, waiting for the pot to boil…
  • More ways to use the chair – I do planks, tricep bench dips. I sit on the chair at times, and do stomach crunches.
  • Stairs: Apart from using the stairs to go up and down, I use them to do push ups. I do about 50 odd a day.  Just because I can!
  • Children : If you have young children, carry them around! Amazing calorie burners.
I am still a few kilos away from my goal. But my goal is not about my weight. I want to stay well, healthy and alive.  I have a lifetime ahead of me, after all.

Feel free to comment on this, share with anyone needing encouragement. Remember, every little does count.  Follow me on Facebook
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 20, 2014 in Diabetes, Diet, Motivation

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: