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Free the Fire

Free the Fire

Fire, peace, warmth, heat, soul
Love, my happiness, your happiness, my goal
Inside the fire, there is deeper fire
To find me, find you, find our desire
Soul knows what the heart refuses to see
this deep longing will never set us free
I close my eyes and live every bit of you and of me
In my thoughts, dreams – we set us free
The desire burns every cell of me, my being,my bones
Your every cell cries out as I hear your moans
In my thoughts, dreams – that’s how we set us free
And in this is the reality of you and of me.

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Posted by on February 5, 2017 in authenticity, Uncategorized

 

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I Stopped Myself From Stopping Myself

I Stopped Myself From Stopping Myself

Drops fell. Slowly. From the corner of my eyes. I tried to keep a straight face. Tried to focus on the meeting I was at. But the tears just kept flowing. I had lost control –  over my pain. Finally, it had caught up with me. I stopped myself from stopping myself. I let it flow. Slowly. And then it gushed out. I was scared of being judged. But in that moment, I had no control.  And it was okay. I felt safe. I was amongst those who loved me. Those who didn’t judge me. Those who did not question me. They just held my hand and let me be.

Darkness had presented itself in many ways. The darkness of actions, reactions, pain, frustration, emotions that were mine, yet no longer mine. I had allowed myself to become this person I wasn’t even aware of. In my heart, I knew my own role in the darkness that I had created for me. That darkness was killing me.

It was a jolt. But it was a lesson

It was time to get up, slowly. It was time to let things go. It was time to stop questioning. It was time to stop forcing. It was time to stop asking. It was time to stop feeling. It was time to look up; accept what it was and it was time to stand back up again. It was time to stop. It was time to start.

As I walked around the waterfront, at my most favourite part of the world – the Bandstand area in Bandra, Mumbai; suddenly it all made sense. Life doesn’t have to be painful. It doesn’t need to be drama.  Neither become one, nor be a participant.

There is so much to learn from the sea. The waves are a perfect example of how life can be a roller coaster, carrying with itself things that don’t even belong to it.Yet it can remain calm, distant and committed.  There is trash and there is treasure. The waves simply accept it, and when it gets too much, it leaves the extras ashore. But the waves don’t stop. They continue on their path. Their role is to keep the current flowing. It provides a constant sense of movement taking everything in its stride. The waves also learnt their lesson each time.

That wave was my lesson. The waves do not force themselves on anyone, nor do they expect to be questioned. I had done the opposite and there was a price to pay for it. I was not defeated. I had learnt. It taught me to just go with the flow. It taught me not to hold on to anything. There are many who will go on a journey with me. Many will throw things into my being. Many will not understand my purpose. Some will bring light. Some will enhance the darkness. I need to learn and grow. I need to keep going. Only allow those whose journey matched mine and are willing to commit to that journey. Not run away when it doesn’t suit them anymore. The journey will continue regardless. The purpose will remain. Authenticity will remain. Lessons will be learnt.

Darkness will bring in the light. And the light will bring magic to the waves.

The magic that the light brings to be waves needs to be felt again. That light is inside of me. And that light is magical.

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 46-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

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Pic courtesy: Online

 
 

Life is like the flowing River

Life is like the flowing River

Ganges. The beautiful flowing river. The river is personified as the Goddess Ganga. I heard someone refer to it as ‘Ganga Ma” (Mother). I had the privilege of standing on the banks of the river Ganga earlier this week in Rishikesh, dipping my feet in her holiness, feeling the force of her flow and suddenly so much happened within me.

Catharsis. That’s what I felt.

I struggle within myself. There are emotions that have been suppressed over childhood, that at times seek solace. They come out and as an adult it becomes harder to deal with it, as we are supposed to be in charge of our emotions. So, the suppression continues. Emotional padding is done. Band-aids put in place, until it re-surfaces. It’s a cycle. Some emotional set back can trigger a reaction and then the cycle continues. It’s a tough place at times. So, I struggle, as I know many do.

So, there in that moment, as I saw the river flow it occurred to me how selfless the river was. It just flowed. It took with it all that flowed with it – all that was dropped into it.

Ganga Ma, the flowing river taught me lessons:

  • She is powerful. She knows her strength. Be like her.
  • She goes with the flow. Be like her. Just flow. Just be.
  • She takes everything in her stride and drops some things along the way. So can I.
  • Some stay part of the way, some will stay the course. Remember that all are not meant to be on the journey together forever.
  • She goes through ups and downs, yet remained focussed on her journey. Never faltering. So, there is a lesson in it.
  • Her destination was controlled by so many – dams, canals, bridges, but the journey was her real gift. That’s so true for all of us. Enjoy the journey.
  • She showed love and she showed her anger  – both felt by those who understood her. It was okay to show emotions but only to those who are part of the journey and care.
  • Most of all she showed me how to cleanse – the mind, the body and the soul, and to keep growing. Every moment. Every day.
  • She taught me to give selflessly. Without expectations. Unconditionally.

I stood there, humbled, hands folded, eyes closed, in prayer. Just listening to her flow. Feeling her energy within me. Wanting to capture that moment inside me so I could carry it beyond that evening.

I felt it was time to cleanse myself. Of my old baggages. Leaving behind those that needed to get off that flowing river. Carrying along new souls as part of the journey. Just being. Just loving. Just living.

Catharsis. Release. Peace. Seeking comfort within. Food  and substance was no longer my comfort. I had found my peace. My release. 

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 46-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

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Pic courtesy: Nicola Fenton.

 

 
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Posted by on July 13, 2016 in Diabetes, Energy, Motivation

 

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Strong Women Cry

Strong Women Cry

I was brought up to believe that if you are strong, you should not cry. Maybe that lesson was first taught to me when at the age of six,  I saw my father die. Perhaps the family felt it was the best way to teach me to deal with pain. Ever since, no matter how hard life was, I never allowed myself to cry. My pain stayed within. I remember my dear mother repeatedly saying to all “she is very strong, she never cries”. And the more I heard her say that, the stronger I stayed for her.

It has taken me 46 years to realise what a load of crap this really is. Strong woman must cry. Because tears are a way of washing away our pain and hurt, isn’t it. 

We are human. We feel all kinds of emotions. Hurt, pain, anger, jealousy, insecurity, happiness, frustration and regardless of what these emotions are, we are best when we allow them to be felt. Anything in excess is bad and we have to learn to manage it, but curbing them is not truly being.

We spend our life trying to get rid of negative emotions that are harmful to our overall well-being. Jealousy, insecurity, anger these are all emotions that stem out of fear. Our fear of losing. Our fear of failure. When we feel these emotions, we must allow it to to be felt and release it, otherwise they fester inside us. These emotions re-appear when exposed. Have you been there? I have been there many times. I suppress these emotions by “distracting” myself. Food, drinking, other distractions — are my typical way of coping.

Often when one is on an emotional low, we hear our well wishers say “find a distraction’ and “it will pass”. I say it no to this solution. We need to “feel it to heal it”. We need to take our time to feel whatever that negative emotion is, accept it, understand it, understand the reasons for that emotion, why is it getting to us. Feel it fully. And then release it. In releasing it, we allow that pain to go away permanently. What it leaves behind is not pain, or emptiness. What it leaves behind is an understanding of that feeling. Healing only happens then.

I have been emotionally very low the past few months. I allowed myself to make poor decisions and that’s ok, it was a choice I made. In making those choices, I found joy as well. However, that also caused a lot of emotional turmoil. Some very good days, and extremely low days. The low days became so painful that often I would end up finding ‘distractions’. It only occurred to me lately that ’emotional lows’ are actually our hearts way of waking us up and saying ‘hey, please deal with this, it’s causing me pain’. And the more we run away from it, the more it returns because it’s not been dealt with. And it only get’s worse.

This time I decided that enough was enough. Each time I run away from pain, and don’t deal with it, it comes back with a greater force and since the lessons are not learnt, the situations that allow me to make poor choices continue.  (and hey, no one else causes us pain, so no ‘karma is not a bitch’. We cause ourselves pain with our choices. It’s another thing that we like to find someone else to blame, but seriously our hurts and pains are caused only by our own choices).

So here is what I intend to do:

  • sit quietly and feel the emotion (anger, hurt, pain, whatever that is)
  • understand and reflect on why that happened, and what made me feel that emotion
  • understand my part in it, and what choices I made
  • reflect and allow the pain to be felt
  • find ways of dealing with the pain so that it does not re-surface
  • let it go. let the fears, the hurt, the anger, the pain of that situation go
  • Accept it fully
  • Move on

And CRY. It is important to cry. I can count on my fingers the number of times I have cried.  I am still not there. Today I wanted to cry and as the tears welled up, I could hear my dear mum’s voice “you are so strong, you never cry” and I stopped myself.

Now I allow myself a few tears every now and again – I am a strong woman and I cry.

Be a strong woman, Cry when you need to.

(Dedicated to my dear mother, on her birthday. I love you and I miss you. We are both strong women and I continue to live through you).

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert , Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 46-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

 

12 Weeks 2 Lose it Challenge Day 2

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

12 Weeks 2 Lose It Challenge Day 1

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

12 weeks challenge – To Lose it

12 weeks challenge – To Lose it

I am re-sharing this post from last year, with minor edits for us to take on this challenge again. Yay girls, let’s do this.

Thank you for joining me in my journey. Again, just to remind you all, I am not a doctor nor a nutritionist. This is not a diet nor a weight loss programme. I will simply share what worked for me and what I intend to do, to reclaim health, re-tune my habits/lifestyle, and in turn lose the excess fat and get fit again. This is intended to support those who need that first step to jump start the change, and to also support each other during the next 12 weeks.

Join our group, click here>>>> Use it to Lose it with Raga (a closed door group only for women.

Do remember, we all are at different stages in our lives – so although we are embarking on this part of our journey together, there are many factors that will determine the results. So, no comparing. No cheating. No excuses. We will do it our way. I hope we all stay the course and make this work – whatever our individual goal.

One thing works universally for all – commitment. That is the key. It wont’ be easy, but it won’t be hard either. We will focus on re-tuning our thinking, making better food choices, adding activity to our daily lives and supporting each other to stay motivated.

Key is to work together and keep each other motivated, positively.

STOP THE EXCUSES PLEASE (This applies to me too) :

I AM TOO OLD: I was 42 when I first lost nearly 30 kilos and beat diabetes, liver diseases, kidney ailments and host of other imbalances my poor lifestyle had created. I did it through pure commitment. I found my age to be a major strength. My commitment levels are much stronger now.

I RUN AROUND ALL DAY AND YET I GAIN WEIGHT: Well, true, but that is not exercise love. Don’t assume or be in denial about activity. Set time aside each day for exercise in any form you are able to. For those with sedentary lifestyles, this is an absolute must. For those with active lifestyles, change the routine, push harder.

I HARDLY EAT ANYTHING: You do love, you do. There are some of us who have a regular high calorie, high fat diet. Some of us eat small meals, but snack a lot in-between meals, whereas some prefer smaller meals but will eat large portions of dessert. That’s how we get fat.It doesn’t just happen. Can we stop being in denial and don’t let yourself fall into a trap of ‘denial’. Remember, every morsel counts – stop yourself from eating that last piece of pizza, toast, snack from your kids, partners plate.

IT’S NOW ABOUT THE WEIGHT, IT IS ABOUT THE FAT: Let’s stop dwelling on this whole weight loss nonsense. Let’s focus on shedding that fat, losing those extra inches. We don’t all need to have amazing gym bodies. We need to have less fat in our bodies so we can be healthy and stay alive fully. Not on meds, not on insulin. But stay high on life.

WHAT WORKED FOR ME:

1.Re-tune the way I thought about food. We are not scrap yards – so why eat junk food? Seriously, as much as we love our fast food, there are better options available. I will avoid white bread, rice, noodles, pasta (unless whole wheat), sugar, dessert, carbs and sweets are out for me.

2.Eat 6 small meals per day: I divide my day into 6 blocks: Morning, Mid morning, Afternoon, Mid afternoon, Evening and Night and plan my meals accordingly. I eat frequently but make healthy choices. For snacks its mostly nuts, fruit, raisins, dry fruit. I do not indulge in cereal bars or anything that is processed – it has high sugar content that has its own impact.

2. Make small changes:

Did you know plates can have a huge role in our food portions? for instance, using a smaller plate helps with portion size (even if you fill it up, it is better than filling up a large plate with food), research shows that using coloured plates verses white plates can help with portion sizes. Avoid second helpings.
Diet coke? Aerated drinks/Energy drinks: These are all excess sugar we don’t need. Junk it. Drink plenty of water (nimbu pani). During my own journey I used to drink 10-12 glasses a day. Helps with detox, makes you less hungry and is extremely useful for digestion.
Plan weekly menu :I will plan my menu a week in advance, so I have no excuse to eat junk.
Maintain a Food/Drink/Activity Diary: I joined MFT (www.myfitnesspal.com) a free online diary to log in my food/drinks/activity and manage my calorie intake. You can find me there. My online name is ‘Raaless’. Happy to help you online when you log in as well.
Add Walk walk walk to your day: I bought myself a pedometer (fitbit) and ensured that I measured number of steps. I started with 5000 steps a day, and slowly built it to 12k-15k a day. It is a great game you can play with yourself. It will come as a surprise to many how little we walk each day, and how much fun it can be to track steps.
Love yourself: Learning to love myself was most important. We forget the most important person in our lives – and that is ourselves. Less stressing about things, finding time to do little things for myself – sleeping better (8 hours atleast ) and not worrying about every thing in life. All that is so critical as well.
My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert , Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

 
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Posted by on April 11, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

The Struggle to lose weight is Real

The Struggle to lose weight is Real

In 2012, I was the biggest I have ever been. I was this 90 kilo (198 lbs/14 stones) person who I couldn’t recognise anymore. Not only had I changed physically; but every bit of me had changed – emotionally and in spirit I was a different person. I lacked self esteem, I lacked self confidence, I behaved much older than my age, I hid in the comfort of my food, the tents I wore for clothes and my constant self deprecating jokes. I was heavy in more ways than one.

The struggle to lose that weight is real. The weight in the physical sense as well as the emotional sense. I struggle even now. I have gained a dramatic 24 lbs (10 kilos) over the last year due to many reasons – this time a physical injury and some emotional issues. The cycle continues. I have re-committed to my health and the starting point is to drop this excess fat that I seem to be carrying. I have given myself 12 weeks to get there.

Here is what I have learnt from experience:

  1. Losing weight is a commitment – you have to feel it in every cell and have to be ready for it. It can’t be ‘maybe’, ‘not today’, ‘perhaps tomorrow’. Commit to yourself and do it. It’s my biggest failing. I fear it the most. Can I do this? I ask. Yet I remember I was there not so very long ago. If I could do it then, I can do it again.  (I need to follow my own weight loss tips from that time I lost 30 kilos)
  2. It’s a family commitment – you can’t feed others junk and eat healthy yourself.  The junk needs to disappear from your pantry, from the snack boxes, from the refrigerator, from everywhere. Just stop buying any thing can makes you feel guilty. I stop buying chocolates and ice creams for the kids. I know it’s only an excuse for my own indulgence.
  3. Exercise and Food go hand in hand: It is so critical to not just exercise but to also eat healthy. It is important to stay active – exercise in any form is important. Even a simple 20 minute walk can reduce our risk of lifestyle diseases.  Calories need to be burnt on a daily basis. I learnt that when I skip exercise, no matter how healthy I eat, it starts showing on my body. The fat creeps back slowly.
  4. Get rid of fizzy drinks. Water is the key: I drink a lot of water. Hot. Cold. Water with lemon. Warm water with honey.It helps me stay hydrated, fills me up and also helps detox. I fully avoid energy drinks, water with sugar, aerated drinks.
  5. Get up each time you fall: I have fallen so many times that each time I fall, I want to stay there in the comfort of that feeling of nothingness forever. It’s such a struggle at that time. Every thing around me goes dark. The pain, the guilt, the challenges are real. I feel alone. I can’t bring myself to meet anyone, cannot motivate myself to go to the gym. I cope by keeping my head down and working working working and then indulge in secret snacking. It’s truly real. The struggle.

I have learnt that no matter how hard I try to let go, the commitment is a decision that I have to make to myself. I have to re-learn to give myself permission to be happy. To let go of all that does not serve me emotionally, spiritually and physically anymore. I have to learn to let go of my own fears; whatever they are.

I have to re-learn to accept that it is a real struggle. I/we have to BE that warrior that I am, that we are, and overcome that struggle with the only way we know. By owning it and by conquering it. 

My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 46-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

Watch my  media interviews for some simple tips.

 

 
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Posted by on March 28, 2016 in Diabetes, Exercise, Motivation, Uncategorized

 

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Grey st(r)ands for fun

Grey st(r)ands for fun

Grey strands in my hair showed up finally as I touched my 46th year. I had this feeling all through my life that at this age somehow I will feel wiser. That a magic button would be felt inside me and I would be able to share my ‘wisdom‘ with all.

I think that magic button of ‘wisdom’ continues to elude me. Do I care? No. I had fun! I continue to have fun. I will continue to live my life having fun. I have pledged to give back as much of my energy, with whatever time I have left on this wonderful planet. 

2015 was a Year of romance for me – It started with this 45 year piscean, a lover of water, paragliding in the dolomites (beautiful Italian Alps); I  remember seeing the ground below from an earth shattering height and something inside me shifted. I suddenly realised there was nothing I couldn’t achieve if I set my mind to it. I could live my wildest dreams if I wanted to.

I dreamt wild, and then I put my dreams into action…

Romance with my feet: My year started with my first ever half marathon of sheer romance with my feet and the ground for 21 kms on 22nd February 2015 to celebrate living. What could be more fun that that sense of achievement, despite spraining my ankle at the 10k mark and continuing on to that finish line.

Wings to do more than fly: The 21 kms gave me wings – I started letting go of my own limitations. This year was the founding year of the ‘Use it 2 Lose it‘ FB group for women who needed support to change their lifestyle and reclaim their health. A group that started in April with 2 members, has now 350 odd members, and growing organically. We are all in here because we all have ONE common goal. To live a healthy life for ourselves and our families.  `You can follow us on the common Use it to Lose it Page for updates.

Lungi dancing on Sky News: This year   appearances in media continued on behalf of Diabetes UK as their South Asian Ambassador, including BBC Breakfast, ITV, Channel 5, Sky News. The highlight was the “Use it 2 Lose it’ group doing a ‘lungi’ dance and interview for Skynews. It’s another story that my lungi dropped off towards the end 🙂.

Pledging fitness to raise funds : My year ended and a new year began with a PLEDGE.  I have often wondered about the poor with diabetes – where do they go? What happens to them? Particularly in a country with no healthcare. The universe sent me Dr Srikanta from the Samatvam Trust in Bengaluru, who run FREE clinics for the poor and needy with diabetic conditions, some very seriously ill requiring amputations and kidney transplants. I pledge to provide every monetary support that I am able to — and I will dedicate my 46th year and for now the next 46 days to 10 kms per day of ‘fun’ activity to fundraise for them, raise awareness of the consequences of diabetes on ourselves and our families and to pledge to stay fit and active. 

Simple fun life. The gray strands do stand for ‘fun’, as I said. Do you agree?

My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

Watch my interviews for some simple tips.

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2016 in Observations

 

100 things I wish I’d known about living with Diabetes – TV ad

 

100 things I wish I’d known about living with diabetes’ is a book full of tips written by people living with diabetes, for people living with diabetes. Covering everything from going on holiday to eating out, working out and managing diabetes with work, relationships and more, it’s packed full of useful tips and handy hints for every part of life with diabetes.

What is the book?
It’s called ‘100 things I wish I’d known about living with diabetes’ and it’s a collection of the most useful tips for living with diabetes, written by the people who know best – people with diabetes and their families.

The book also has information about Diabetes UK’s services and support for people with diabetes and their loved ones.

Who is the book for?
Anyone who has any form of diabetes or is affected by diabetes – partners, family and friends of people with diabetes will find it useful, too. Whether you’re newly diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for years, we hope you’ll discover new and inspiring tips that you find helpful in everyday life.

How can I get the book?
You can order it free here https://100things.diabetes.org.uk/. If you know someone who might also find the book useful, let them know they can order their free copy as well. (this is available only in UK).

What kind of tips will I find in the book?
Tips that can help you in all kinds of everyday situations from knowing the local word for carbohydrate when you go on holiday to knowing the best time of day to buy shoes for the best fit. The book includes tips covering eating out, working out, and managing diabetes with work, study, relationships and more. The book is divided into five handy sections to help you find the tips you’re looking for quickly and easily.

How were the tips chosen?
We asked everyone living with diabetes to send in their tips and received over 1,100. We checked each tip with our clinical team, and our panel of people with diabetes helped us to choose the final shortlist based on the tips that would be most useful to people affected by diabetes.

My story so far:

“A Ticking Time Bomb”.

That was the blunt description given the mounting problem of Type 2 Diabetes within the South Asian Diaspora community in the United Kingdom a few years ago.

According to research, immigrants to the UK from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other nations from South Asia are six times more likely than the indigenous white population to develop Type 2 Diabetes.

Whilst current evidence is inconclusive as to why British Asians are more susceptible to the disorder, medical experts have pointed to the twin evils of a diet high in carbohydrates and saturated fatty acids (all those chapattis and rice dishes) as well as alarmingly low levels of physical activity, especially among older South Asian women, as two of the most significant contributory factors to a problem that is certain to put a huge burden on families and the community at large.

Alarmingly, there is widespread ignorance about Type 2 Diabetes within the community, according to medical experts, which threatens the lives of thousands.

Mumbai-born, with ten amazing years in New Zealand, now North London-based marketing and advertising expert, Raga D’silva was among those ignorant masses.

The 45-year-old mother of twins, whose family had a history of Diabetes, was diagnosed with this illness in 2012. The news brought about a radical change in Raga and has inspired her to help others with Diabetes and raise awareness.

Raga is the Asian Ambassador for Diabetes UK.

Watch my interviews for some simple tips.

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2016 in Uncategorized

 
 
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